Tag: Seasonal

Happy Fall, Y’all!

Happy November, everyone! Time is flying over here, so before we get too close to winter I’d like to share about a fun fall-themed book I enjoyed introducing to my daughter that has Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) (Rosalie) this year. If you follow Everyday CVI on Facebook or Instagram, you may have already seen me mention this book, but I thought it was worth sharing here on the blog as well. ๐Ÿ˜‰

The Littlest Pumpkin” book (which has English, braille, and tactile images of foam pumpkins) is available through American Printing House for the Blind and can be purchased with federal quota funds. If you’re in the United States, this means you can ask your teacher for the visually impaired (TVI) about getting a copy at no cost to you.

Pumpkin 1

Our TVI dropped this book off on our front porch back in September (I’m bummed our therapies need to be virtual right now, but so grateful to have a team that still delivers tangible materials to us!), but it didn’t really come to life for Rosalie until October – after we visited a farm and brought real pumpkins home.

People with CVI often struggle to visually understand novel 2D images, which is why pairing books with 3D objects is such a helpful strategy for learning.

Pumpkin 2

Many times I simply have toy versions of what is shown in books, so I have to specify that it is a “TOY” and ensure that I use salient feature language to describe and/or provide tactile opportunities to help teach how the real thing looks and feels. But when I have the actual object (like a real pumpkin), that’s even better!

Pumpkin 3

What kinds of seasonal objects have you been using to teach someone with CVI about this time of year and/or to provide them visual access to stories? Please share in the comments below!

Celebrating Halloween (CVI style)

Happy Halloween!

Two of the “10 characteristics of CVI” are color and complexity. This means bright, highly-saturated hues that are solid colors (with little or no patterns) tend to be easier for someone with Cortical Visual Impairment to visually process.

Red is one of the first colors our brains learn to process as infants, so it’s no wonder Elmo is often a favorite of little ones with CVI! He is solid, bright red and easily identifiable with his simple eyes and big, orange nose.

Elmo-wm
Pictured: little girl dressed in an Elmo costume, surrounded by 4 Elmo dolls.

Another CVI characteristic is noveltywhich means a child with CVI will be drawn to the familiar since new people/places/things are much more challenging to visually process. Someone with CVI cannot simply “look” and learn what something new is; they must learn the distinct, salient features that categorize objects for what they are, which means new things require building a new framework of understanding in the brain…whereas familiar objects are ones the brain has already learned to “see” (process).

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Happy Halloween (with a little CVI adaptation)!

Happy Halloween! I have a handful of upcoming posts that I have not yet had time to finish, but I figured I would at least pop in to share one special way I have incorporated Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) into our family’s Halloween decorations this year.

My husband and I began a yearly tradition of visiting a pumpkin patch (or, during the busiest years, a store that sells pumpkins) and painting a pumpkin for each person in our family. We were unable to paint pumpkins last year because we were a little bit busy with a certain newborn (cough, Rosalie), but we managed to resume the tradition this year – hooray!

I always get to paint the baby’s pumpkin, so you’d better believe I wasn’t going to miss this opportunity to advocate and raise awareness for my daughter! Check out how I painted Rosalie’s pumpkin:

Pumpkin-wm

Pictured on the front is clearly Rosalie’s initial…but I took advantage of Halloween’s CVI-friendly color scheme to highlight an adaptation for teaching a child with CVI how to read! The black background with a white letter surrounded by a bubble of bright, high-contrast color (like orange) is a key adaptation that – paired with appropriate descriptive language – can help a child with CVI begin to see the salient features of a letter (or word’s) shape.

And check out how I managed to sneak in a little extra CVI advocacy on the back….

Pumpkin2-wm

Pumpkin3-wm
#EverydayCVI #StartSeeingCVI #CorticalVisualImpairment #CVI

Rosalie is only a year old and will stay home while her big brothers go out trick-or-treating, so we do not yet have to worry about the complexity and sensory array of costumes or trick-or-treating (thank Goodness). But, for future reference I would love to learn about your own Halloween-related CVI adaptations!